EyeToy Vision – facial recognition using the PlayStation 2 EyeToy camera

The PlayStation 2 EyeToy was released in 2003 and was basically a USB webcam that you could attach to your PS2 to play certain games using your body and voice commands. For my current job, I have been developing a strength training application using Microsoft’s Kinect for Xbox One which piqued my interest in computer vision. I started messing around with facial recognition on the Kinect using HD face as well as a more traditional PCA based approach using Eigen Faces from this great sample here. I then remembered that I had an old EyeToy USB camera laying around at home that I could use as a capture device and use OpenCV for some basic face recognition. I started work on it last night and now have an working(ish) example of how to use the EyeToy for facial recognition using OpenCV. Bear in mind this is the first time I have done a VC++ project so I probably didn’t do everything in an optimal way.

screenshot

Requirements:

-EyeToy USB Camera (The one I used was an early model and was manufactured by Logitech, later EyeToys were manufactured by Namtai. I have not tested the driver with a Namtai made EyeToy but I am pretty sure it will work.)

-An open USB port (does not work properly with USB hubs)

-Visual Studio 2015 or higher (I compiled with VS 2017 Enterprise)

-EyeToy Vision Source Code: https://shravanj.com/files/EyeToyVision.zip

Before we can begin discussing the program, we need to install the EyeToy drivers, since there is no official PS2 EyeToy driver for Windows. I followed this guide and got it working on Windows 10: http://metricrat.co.uk/ps2-eyetoy-on-windows-8-64-bit-working/

You’ll need to download the driver (which I have uploaded to my website for your convenience here) and extract it. Once you have done that open up a command prompt window with administrator permissions. We need to temporarily disable driver signing verification so we can install the driver. Enter in the following commands:

bcdedit -set loadoptions DISABLE_INTEGRITY_CHECKS

bcdedit -set TESTSIGNING ON

From the Device Manager, find the EyeToy, right click and select Update Driver. Select let me pick from list -> have disk -> locate the unzipped driver folder and select HLCLASSIC.inf. Click continue when prompted about the unsigned driver. Once finished, re-enable driver signing enforcement like so:

bcdedit -set loadoptions ENABLE_INTEGRITY_CHECKS

bcdedit -set TESTSIGNING OFF

Verify the driver works by opening up the testing application inside the driver folder.

Now that we have the driver setup and ready, we need to prepare Visual Studio. In my initial stages of development, I tried linking OpenCV directly to VS but I never got it to work properly, so instead I found a NuGet package that manages the whole thing for me. Named opencvcontrib, it contains a x64 compiled version of OpenCV 3.1 and more importantly includes the contributed modules which contains the FaceRecognizer class which is not found in the stand alone version of OpenCV. In order for this to work, we need the Visual Studio 2015 platform tools because that was what the whole OpenCV source was built against. If you are using VS 2015 you do not need to do anything, but if you are using VS 2017 like me, you will need to install the 2015 platform tools. To do this, go to Start Menu > Visual Studio Installer. Click the menu icon for you installed VS 2017 product and select Modify. Open the Individual Components tab and scroll down to Compilers, build tools, and runtimes. Select the “VC++ 2015.3 v140 toolset (x86,x64)” and install it. You are now ready to compile the program.

I will get more in depth on the actual programming in another post, I just wanted to share my initial progress on this project.

 

 

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